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Pangkupirri (Rockhole) Dreaming #170

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Nyurapayia Nampitjinpa. Pangkupirri (Rockhole) Dreaming #170. Acrylic paint on canvas. 182 x 152 cm (71.7 x 59.8 in). 2008. Central and Western Desert. This painting depicts the site known as Pangkupirri, a holy place located near Tjukurrla, close to the Northern Territory / Western Australian border. This painting also depicts the ‘Tjukurrpa' story of water and Mrs. Bennett has also depicted the Pilkati (rainbow serpent) who created the sacred water holes in the Dreamtime.

A group of women gathered near these sacred water holes and conducted ceremony, part of which was the preparation of a seed cake made from the wild bush tomato referred to as kumparapara. This is an important part of women's initiation ceremony rituals. The roundel patterns represent the water holes and sacred sites located in Mr's Bennett's country. The linear designs depict aspects of the landscape including the sand dunes (tali) and rock escarpments (puli).

Nyurapayia Nampitjinpa also known as Mrs. Bennett was born around 1935 in Yumara, Western Australia. Today Mrs. Bennett lives in Kintore. She was married to the late John John Tjapangati, a Pintupi speaker from Mukulurru, also north of Docker River.Mrs. Bennett started painting in the mid 90s. Together with Naata Nungurrayi she was an important participant in a collaboration project on canvas between female painters of Kintore and related women from the center of Ikuntji Bluff entitled ‘Minyma Tjukurrpa'.

Gradually Mrs. Bennett developed a free and original style that differs from most painters of Kintore who prefer a more precise ‘dot-painting' method. Mrs. Bennett mostly works with strong contrasts through the use of blacks and pale yellow/cream hues set against a red/brown background. Often her work depicts the gathering of traditional 'bush' food and the rituals associated with their preparation in and around the rockhole site of Pangkupirri.